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Comments

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Jo

You have done a lot! Yay.

Lin

Sounds like an Acorn Woodpecker.

Among other behaviors, the Acorn Woodpecker "stores insects in cracks or crevices and nuts in indiviually-drilled holes in graneries. A granary tree may hold as many 50,000 holes. Holes are usually drilled in dead limbs and in thick bark during the winter. Any dead or living tree with deep dry bark can used as granary. Studies have shown that these granaries are so important that they are one of the main reasons why acorn woodpeckers live in such large families, at least in California. Only a large group can collect so many acorns and also defend them against other groups."

We opted against buying a particular house here in Topanga because Acorn Woodpeckers were using the wood siding of the house as a granary.

badgerbag

I totally love Acorn Woodpeckers! But they're not blue. I used to watch them do their stuff in trees and telephone poles at my old house in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

You know another bird who lives in colonies... Quaker, or Monk, Parakeets. I used to admire their huge colonies in Hyde Park in Chicago!

It was bizarre to see a jay behave kind of like an acorn woodpecker, anyway.

Lin

I'm such a macaroon. I sent the comment off BEFORE I finished my train of thought cos the doorbell rang. Sheesh. Anyway...what I meant to continue saying was that bluejays sometimes mock other birds behaviors, much like the mockingbird mocks songs, but I've NEVER heard of one acting like an acorn woodpecker. Amazing stuff.

JR

Scrub jays on the West Coast do bury nuts regularly and, get this... they've done some research on this and found that some jays will note if they're being observed by other jays while burying. They come back when they're alone and re-bury the nuts somewhere else. Here's the kicker: the only ones that re-bury are the ones that have stolen buried nuts from others. More naive jays, ones who haven't learned to steal, don't come back and re-bury. Amazing, huh?

badgerbag

Wow JR! I have to go look that up. "Thieving jays", right?

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