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Comments

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Iris

It is interesting that this is so similar to the classic 'wiener schnitzel' .. although I see that in my ancient Austrian cookbook they mix the oil with lard (delicious).

savtadotty

I make mine the very same way, with one additional ingredient mixed together with unseasoned breadcrumbs: some grated parmesan cheese. (I'm getting so Green and time-rich in my old age that I home-blend breadcrumbs from stored-in-the-freezer leftover bread.)

Joshua

Um, unless by dish-towel you mean a paper-towel, patting raw chicken with anything you're going to touch other surfaces in the kitchen with isn't a recommended practice. Not even if your mom and grandma did it....

badgerbag

Silly, but it's just to dry the chicken off and of course then you WASH the dishtowel....

I forgot about the parmesan - optional but if you do it, it's best if it's real parm and you hand grate it. not the powdered kind you buy.


minnie

always make a batch of fresh breadcrumbs to mix in with the progrsso ones.

this is after making it with Grandma one day.

put all this stuff in the cusinart:
stale bread - any kind really
garlic - lots of it
parmesan cheese - get the good kind (this is of vital importance)from the italian deli near you
fresh italian parsely.

lori

don't eat the blog!

RJ Mical

yay! thank you for this. i know what i'm serving at the next movienight. this and your favorite cookies...

Melissa

The chicken sounds YUMMY!

Debra

Rinsing chicken is an old wives tale that it will wash some of the germs off. That part's not really necessary, but do it if it makes you feel better.

Pat dry with a paper towel (old-timers, yes, would use a dishtowel).

Normally you first dredge the flattened meat in flour, then egg and seasoned breadcrumbs. (wet to dry/dry to wet...). Even after being patted with a towel, chicken is considered a "wet".

Since this is so similar to weinerschnitzel, try a squeeze of lemon on top. (I like it; Steve.. not so much).

Also a good way to cook pork tenderloin.

Mary

Remind me to invite you over for a potluck.

badgerbag

Look, you crazy wienerschnitzel people, what you don't understand is that the chicken cutlets are merely a delivery system for the main and best food group: really good olive oil.

liz

I pound chicken breasts flat using my smaller cast iron skillet. Seems to work better than the mallet. You put the chicken breasts between waxed paper sheets. Since I'm usually making chicken piccata, I sprinkle them with lemon juice first.

David in Israel just published his Great Grandma Dora's flounder recipe:

http://bogieworks.blogs.com/treppenwitz/2006/04/cold_fish.html

A 'Warm' Tradition

One of the most cherished traditions Zahava and I inherited from my mother's family is a delicious recipe for lightly breaded fried sole flounder fillets. I'll be happy to share the recipe so long as people don't mind measurements like 'a pinch'... 'a smidgen'... 'a sprinkling'... etc., but be prepared... because the true greatness of this oniony, peppery dish is the fact that it is served cold.

In order to do this recipe justice it needs to be prepared well in advance. As each batch is passed carefully from the frying pan to the platter and stacked gently between layers of paper towel to absorb the excess oil, the house fills with the intoxicating smell of fried onions and pepper that are part and parcel of the breading.

Once finished, all the fish is placed lovingly in the refrigerator to await the hungry crowd that will hungrily devour every last crumb and stray burnt onion.

Complete instructions for making the dish follow at the original post

http://bogieworks.blogs.com/treppenwitz/2006/04/cold_fish.html

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