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Liz

Hi friend, go read this article on language development, it is right on what you are saying:

http://www.childrenofthecode.org/interviews/risley.htm

quote:
": It wasn't until we'd collected our data that we realized that the important variable was how much talking the parents were doing. You see?

David Boulton: Which kept it nice and clean, because there was no bias introduced to the parents to behave in any other way than they normally would.

Dr. Todd Risley: That's right. Exactly. It was our ideas that we were looking for vocabulary growth and where it came from and how it came into play, so we thought we were focusing on the child, too.

So, after we had done that we realized that the massive dimension was the amount of talking… the differences. We couldn't even see that while we were taking the data. It was about the amount of talking. Remember when parents are talking to one and two-year-old children, they're talking about the same kind of things. It's all about eating and feeding and possessions and toileting, and things like that, so it's kind of invisible.

This difference that we found, which was the first discovery, was just massive differences between families in the amount of talking. We didn't expect it. We weren't looking for it. We were looking for teachable moments and whether parents capitalized on opportunities to expand the child's vocabulary in formal ways, like we would as teachers. What we found instead was something really much more fundamental, which is just amount of talking."

Liz

Hi friend, go read this article on language development, it is right on what you are saying:

http://www.childrenofthecode.org/interviews/risley.htm

quote:
": It wasn't until we'd collected our data that we realized that the important variable was how much talking the parents were doing. You see?

David Boulton: Which kept it nice and clean, because there was no bias introduced to the parents to behave in any other way than they normally would.

Dr. Todd Risley: That's right. Exactly. It was our ideas that we were looking for vocabulary growth and where it came from and how it came into play, so we thought we were focusing on the child, too.

So, after we had done that we realized that the massive dimension was the amount of talking… the differences. We couldn't even see that while we were taking the data. It was about the amount of talking. Remember when parents are talking to one and two-year-old children, they're talking about the same kind of things. It's all about eating and feeding and possessions and toileting, and things like that, so it's kind of invisible.

This difference that we found, which was the first discovery, was just massive differences between families in the amount of talking. We didn't expect it. We weren't looking for it. We were looking for teachable moments and whether parents capitalized on opportunities to expand the child's vocabulary in formal ways, like we would as teachers. What we found instead was something really much more fundamental, which is just amount of talking."

toobeaut

There was an article in the Chronicle yesterday about how Albertson's is becoming the equivalent of the Shrinking Middle Class when it comes to supermarkets: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/10/06/BUGCMF30IV1.DTL&hw=cala+bell&sn=001&sc=1000

Lisa Hirsch

The class stuff is totally fascinating. I read a summary a few years back about research on the number of words children from different educational/economic classes hear from their parents every day. Poor families: 900 different words/day. Richer/better educated families: up to 2000 different words per day. What are the effects of THAT on brain and social development?

The nexus of lesbian processing: a succinct description of why one female lover is fine for me but two would be torture. However, two men or one of each would work!

Lea

Since HEB is functionally the only grocery store chain in San Antonio, it reinvents itself depending on where the store is located. "Nicer" locations have the aisles of organics and Hole Fuds-type cosmetics and personal care, and someone demonstrating food prep. Regular location's fanciest thing is a deli.
There's also the super fancy-schmancy one in the Old Money area.

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